About our Streets

The City of Cape maintains more than 230 miles of street and 22 miles of alleyways, which is roughly the same distance as a drive to St Louis and back. The average age of our streets is close to 35 years. About two-thirds of our streets are lighter-colored concrete and the remaining streets are dark asphalt. Street Maintenance efforts are coordinated by both our Public Works and Community Development Departments. 

Evaluations are done by Public Works inspectors on approximately half of our city streets each year. Each street segment is given a rating number which falls into classifications from good to failed. According to our 2017 data, 74% of our streets are considered good or satisfactory with 18% being fair and 8% are classified poor or lower. This data, along with continuing city evaluations and public input throughout the year help prioritize street work. The Public Works Department has a crew of 4-6 people who typically work on street repairs when weather allows, as well as a Stormwater/Street Inspector and a Special Project Coordinator who spend at least part of their time on contracted street repair projects. These can involve concrete street and curb repair/replacement or pothole patching.

Public Works

The Public Works Department has a crew of 4-6 people who typically work on street repairs when weather allows, as well as a Stormwater/Street Inspector and a Special Project Coordinator who spend at least part of their time on contracted street repair projects. These can involve concrete street and curb repair/replacement or pothole patching.
Pothole Patching
Photo of Asphalt Patching MachinePothole patching is especially needed after a heavy winter. Water tunnels under streets through defects caused by traffic, then freezes and expands making the pavement also expand and weaken. When the ice melts, there is sometimes a void left under the street. As traffic travels over the weakened pavement, it breaks and forms potholes.
 
During the summer and warmer months, potholes are patched using our pothole patching machine. This machine blows debris out of the hole, sprays in a tacky oil substance then sprays on aggregate. Loose gravel is then swept away and traffic can resume almost instantly. Unfortunately, this process works best during warmer months. During the cooler season, we go “old school” shoveling cold mix asphalt from the back of a truck into the hole for what usually ends up being a temporary fix. 
Concrete Repair
Public Works manages the concrete part of the Neighborhood Street Repair Contract which is funded through our Transportation Trust Fund Program. A contractor is hired to make these repairs. Other concrete repairs are funded through our general budget and done by Public Works employees

Community Development Department

Our Community Development Department manages the majority of street construction funded through the Transportation Trust Fund Program. The annual Asphalt Overlay Project is funded through this program and is usually completed by contractors in the warmer months. We are currently implementing TTF5 (the fourth renewal of the Transportation Trust Fund Tax). 

Street and Lane Closures

Construction ZoneUtility companies, contractors, government agencies, and other private entities close streets for various repairs and projects. Thank you for being mindful of the workers on site. Known and substantial closures are posted on the City’s website and social media, and sent to our weekly email subscribers and local media. 


Graph of Street Conditions